Getting Organized with ADD / ADHD

How to get organized with ADD / ADHD

Do you or someone you love have ADD / ADHD and struggle with getting or staying organized?

It is a big challenge for sure, and often overwhelming.  Here are some ideas and strategies for getting organized with ADD / ADHD diagnosis that are in the form of sort of a round up with my fantastic commentary on each source!  And here we go!

Value experiences over stuff

This resource has 33 specific strategies for getting organized.

One of my favorite suggestions is to buy experiences, not objects.  You won’t have the same issue with memories as you will with physical objects turning into clutter.  Make it not even an issue by looking for opportunities to avoid buying items you don’t really need and replace them with experiences that will yield fantastic memories!

 

Set a timer

Setting time limits for decision making is a great strategy to keep a person with ADD / ADHD from getting stuck as suggested in this article.  Not having a set time to make a decision can lead to paralysis.

You can also avoid getting sucked into different things (Facebook, Pinterest, and other black holes of time-suckage are prime examples) and have hours whizz by unbeknownst to you by using this timer tactic as well.    And once you set the timer, abide by it!  When the timer dings, you are done with the task and need to move onto the next thing on your schedule.

 

Change is possible

This article addresses some common myths about getting organized with ADD.  One that especially struck me is that “ADD/ADHD is a life sentence – I’ll always suffer from its symptoms.”  Not true.  A person with ADD or ADHD will have to learn how to implement strategies to overcome the barriers the disorder brings.

 

Schedules are your friend

I found a good and brief slideshow with many ideas, including setting a schedule and collecting your thoughts in one place.

A calendar or planner system will help you get organized.  If you’re a fan of paper planners, I’ve designed a few different planners that will fit the bill.  Check them out!

Not all calendars will work for every person.  Find the system you prefer, electronic or paper, and stick with it!

I’ve recently discovered Google Keep.  It has less structure than some other online lists keepers/organizers, but I kinda am digging that!

 

See what you need to deal with

Five reasons you can’t stay organized are listed here, including a lack of awareness, or simply stated, not seeing the clutter.  You can’t fix what you don’t even realize is there.

You’ll be able to see more when you have less to see, so start clearing the clutter.

 

Labels are also your friend

This article on WebMd echoes the calendar suggestion and adds the idea of labeling your life.  I love labels!  It’s important to label things correctly- put them where you’ll actually see them (on at least 3 sides of a box or container) and use a dark lettering to make sure the label can be seen!

 

Over to you!

Many of these tips and strategies are great for everyone, not just for those with ADD or ADHD.  What is your favorite strategy?

What other resources have you found?

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6 Comments

  1. I wish more people would follow the idea of buying experiences instead of things. I’m equally guilty on this one. I know my kids will remember and treasure the trip we took to Europe a few years ago, so much more than any trinkets we bought while we were there. And I will too!

  2. I love the “buy experiences not objects” . This article really resonated with me as my son has ADD/OCD and both my brother and father have Dyslexia. I pinned it for future reference.

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